Baseball News

  • It only took MLB umpires one day to get the commissioner’s attention with their protest against the abusive treatment they say they receive from players. The white wristbands worn by umpires during Saturday’s games were gone on Sunday after commissioner Rob Manfred agreed to sit down with the umpires at a later date.
  • Giancarlo Stanton crushed a 432-foot home run over the fountain at Marlins Park in the third inning of Tuesday’s game against the San Francisco Giants. Miami would lose the contest 9-4, halting its four-game winning streak, but Stanton extended his homer streak to six games, continuing the torrid pace of power-hitting he’s displayed over the last six weeks.
  • The Washington Nationals watched their season flash before their eyes on Saturday when Bryce Harper slipped on a wet first base after rain delayed their game against the San Francisco Giants. Harper’s left knee bent awkwardly as he tumbled to the ground, raising concerns of a possible ligament tear, but the team announced he suffered a significant bone bruise, meaning he could play again before the end of the year.
  • Eight shutout innings by Chris Sale helped the Boston Red Sox to their seventh straight win on Tuesday, a 2-0 triumph over the Tampa Bay Rays. The Rays are third in the AL East, but Tuesday’s loss puts them six and a half games back of Boston, which looks like the team to beat in the division right now.
  • Two of the biggest teams in baseball bolstered their postseason chances at the trade deadline on Monday when the New York Yankees and the Los Angeles Dodgers landed the two most-coveted pitchers available. The Yankees added Sonny Gray from the Oakland Athletics, while Los Angeles acquired Yu Darvish from the Texas Rangers, adding an ace to each team’s starting rotation.
  • With one double on Sunday, Adrian Beltre reached the rare milestone of 3,000 career hits. Only 30 other players have ever accomplished the feat, which is a testament to Beltre’s consistency and longevity. The 38-year-old third-baseman is in his 20th season and doesn’t show any signs of slowing down, winning a gold glove in each of the last two seasons and batting over .300 on the otherwise-disappointing Texas Rangers.
  • If any team can afford to lose its top pitcher for a stretch of the season, it’s the Los Angeles Dodgers, who have the best record in the National League and hold a massive lead in the NL West. The Dodgers weathered an injury to Clayton Kershaw last season before winning their fourth straight division title, and they will need to do so again with Kershaw likely to miss the next four to six weeks with a back injury.
  • Pablo Sandoval and the Boston Red Sox probably just want to forget they had anything to do with each other. Very little has gone right for Sandoval since he signed a massive deal with Boston in 2014, but he is still the same Sandoval who helped the San Francisco Giants win three World Series championships in five years, and the Giants are apparently willing to give him another chance.
  • The Minnesota Twins are hoping Bartolo Colon can bring some stability to the back end of their starting rotation, even if the 44-year-old only lasted four innings into his Twins debut Tuesday against the New York Yankees. Minnesota could be the final stop on Colon’s 20-season MLB journey, as the Twins were able to pick him up on a minor league contract after his release from the Atlanta Braves, and his first start with his new team could best be described as a mixed bag.
  • Until last Friday, Robinson Cano wasn’t even on the 2017 All-Star roster, but the Seattle Mariners slugger made his eighth appearance in the midsummer classic count. Cano was named MVP for putting the American League ahead 2-1 with a solo home run in the top of the 10th inning, leading to the AL’s fifth straight victory over the National League.
  • The Houston Astros have been the best team in the American League for the first half of the season, and they showed why on Sunday in a 19-1 drubbing of the Toronto Blue Jays. Houston’s high-powered offense hit five home runs against a parade of pitchers for the Blue Jays, who—like many teams in 2017—had no answer for the depth of the Astros.
  • The Toronto Blue Jays spent the last two MLB trade deadlines as buyers, but they will have different goals in mind this year as July 31 approaches. Toronto is no longer the playoff contender it grew into in 2015, sitting six games under .500 midway through the season, which makes the deadline a time to maximize assets rather than stock up for October.
  • Miguel Montero made the Chicago Cubs choose between backing a Cy Young winner, or their backup catcher. It wasn’t a difficult choice. Montero was designated for assignment on Wednesday in response to comments he made about Jake Arrieta and the Cubs’ pitching staff, blaming their slow delivery for the seven stolen bases recorded by the Washington Nationals in Tuesday’s game.
  • It’s been a bad week for the New York Yankees—especially their pitching. A seven-game losing skid has taken much of the shine off of New York’s surprising start to the season, and Tuesday’s 8-3 loss to the Los Angeles Angels dropped the Yankees a half-game behind the rival Boston Red Sox for the AL East lead, adding insult to injury.
  • Hunter Greene is an exciting prospect for many reasons. The high-school senior is already throwing fastballs at 100 mph, and he hits with power and consistency. But the fact that he can do both so well has made him one of the more intriguing picks at the 2017 MLB draft, where two-way players are stealing the show.
  • Scooter Gennett may never be a household name, but he hit his way into baseball’s record books on Tuesday. The Cincinnati Reds second-baseman entered the day with 34 home runs in just over 500 career games, but he added four more in a 13-1 rout of the St. Louis Cardinals, producing the best batting performance in Reds history and joining an exclusive club that includes some of baseball’s all-time greats.
  • The Los Angeles Angels will be without the best hitter in baseball for at least six weeks, which doesn’t bode well for their chances of staying competitive in the American League playoff race. Mike Trout will undergo surgery Wednesday to repair a torn ligament in his left thumb, leaving a gaping hole in the Angels’ lineup that will test the depth of their roster for up to two months.                                        
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    LiveBets.ca wants to send one lucky reader to see Canada’s only professional baseball team defend its home turf in downtown Toronto on the 150th anniversary of the nation’s birth.
  • The Minnesota Twins weren’t supposed to be good this year, but don’t tell that to Ervin Santana. The 34-year-old starter shut down the high-powered offense of the Baltimore Orioles on Tuesday, pitching a 2-hit shutout for his seventh win and second complete game of 2017. The 2-0 victory maintained Minnesota’s slim lead in the AL Central, which is a remarkable place for the franchise to be after bottoming out in 2016.
  • Kevin Pillar and the Toronto Blue Jays were in damage control mode after Pillar yelled a homophobic slur during a loss to the Atlanta Braves on Wednesday. Toronto suspended Pillar for two games in a move supported by the MLB, which has dealt with similar situations in the past - including another recent one involving a Toronto player.
  • Derek Jeter took his place alongside other New York Yankees legends when his number was retired at Yankees Stadium on Sunday. The Yankees have been primarily focused on rebuilding since the end of the Jeter era, and the retirement of his No. 2 comes at a time when New York’s next era of talent looks ready to break out.
  • Anthony Rendon slugged his way into Washington Nationals history with an incredible performance Sunday. Rendon became just the second player in MLB history to record at least six hits, three home runs, and 10 RBIs in one game as part of Washington’s 23-run explosion against the New York Mets.
  • Matt Barnes is paying the price for an act of retribution that got a little out of hand. The Boston Red Sox reliever has been suspended four games by Major League Baseball for throwing a fastball behind the head of Baltimore Orioles infielder Manny Machado on Sunday.
  • The Chicago Cubs don’t look like themselves. The franchise that ran roughshod over the entire league in 2016 en route to a curse-shattering World Series title dropped its fourth straight game Monday, dropping below .500 with a 6-3 loss to the Milwaukee Brewers. It is still early enough in the season for the Cubs’ struggles to be considered part of their championship hangover, but the fact that they are struggling at all is surprising.
  • For Marcus Stroman, Wednesday’s World Baseball Classic final was about more than a championship. Stroman was roughed up by Puerto Rico in the first inning of their second-round matchup—the United States’ only loss in the round—and he got his revenge by carrying a no-hitter into the seventh inning to help team USA win the WBC title for the first time.
  • The rematch of the 2013 World Baseball Classic final lived up to its billing on Tuesday. Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic both crushed their competition in the first round of the 2017 World Baseball Classic, and their second-round matchup was filled with talent, drama, and a little bit of revenge on the part of Puerto Rico, which prevailed 3-1 to end the defending champions’ 11-game winning streak.
  • While it might run counter to the notion of the MLB’s free agent signing period being a frenzy of massive contracts, patience is often a virtue in baseball negotiations. Nowhere was this more apparent than in the way the Toronto Blue Jays squandered their opportunity to hang onto fan-favourite slugger Edwin Encarnacion, who said he would have stayed with the Blue Jays if their offer had remained on the table.
  • The St. Louis Cardinals are paying a hefty price for the actions of former employee Chris Correa. The MLB concluded its investigation of Correa’s hacking into the Houston Astros’ computer database by ordering St. Louis to forfeit their top two picks in the 2017 draft to Houston and pay the Astros $2 million, closing the book on an embarrassing chapter for both franchises.
  • Jose Bautista will remain a Blue Jay. The veteran outfielder re-signed with Toronto on Tuesday following more than two months of free-agency, opting to return to the place he’s called home since 2008. The new contract is reportedly a one-year deal worth $18 million, with mutual options that could extend it through the 2019 season.
  • The wait is finally over. After more than a century, the Chicago Cubs are World Series champions once again. Chicago rallied from a 3-1 series deficit against the Cleveland Indians and survived a wild Game 7 on Wednesday, winning 8-7 in a game that spanned 10 innings and a rain delay, totalling four and a half hours.


  • The World Series is now a best-of-one. The Cleveland Indians saw their 3-1 series lead over the Chicago Cubs evaporate, first with a 3-2 nail-biter in Game 5, and then with a 9-3 rout in Cleveland on Tuesday that included the first World Series grand slam in Cubs history, coming off the bat of Addison Russell to help force a Game 7 on Wednesday.