Hockey News

  • Winning the Stanley Cup may have cost the Washington Capitals their coach. Barry Trotz announced his decision to resign as head coach of the Capitals on Monday, ending speculation he would sign a contract extension with the franchise he just guided to a championship. The decision appears to be motivated by financial reasons, as Trotz is in line for a big raise as a championship coach.
  • One more win is all that stands between Alex Ovechkin and the Washington Capitals finally ascending hockey’s highest peak and capturing the Stanley Cup that has eluded them for decades.
  • Less than a year ago the hockey world was awaiting the arrival of the Vegas Golden Knights. Now the Golden Knights are the ones waiting for an opponent in the Stanley Cup Final.
  • The Washington Capitals are making the most of the franchise’s first Eastern Conference Final appearance in 20 years, jumping out to a 2-0 series lead with a pair of road victories against the Tampa Bay Lightning.
  • Marc-Andre Fleury stood out once again as the Vegas Golden Knights moved ever closer to a Stanley Cup title in their inaugural season. Fleury stopped all 28 shots he faced on Sunday to eliminate the San Jose Sharks and move Vegas into the Western Conference final, where the Golden Knights will face either the Winnipeg Jets, or the Nashville Predators.
  • The Toronto Maple Leafs got what they needed from Lou Lamoriello, who will step aside after three years as the team’s general manager. Lamoriello, who made his name turning the New Jersey Devils from a perennial flop into a three-time Stanley Cup champion, was brought in to instill a winning culture throughout Toronto’s organization after decades of futility, and his decisions helped shape Toronto into a franchise many see competing for a championship in the coming years.
  • The Washington Capitals and the Pittsburgh Penguins can be forgiven if they feel like they know each other a little too well.
  • The Toronto Maple Leafs visit the Boston Bruins on Wednesday for the seventh and final game of their first-round playoff series, in a situation very similar to when these two teams met in the playoffs five years ago. 
  • Mark down another first for the Vegas Golden Knights, who became the first NHL team to sweep a playoff series in their inaugural season on Tuesday with a 1-0 win over the Los Angeles Kings. The Golden Knights contained Los Angeles throughout the series, winning four close games thanks to the stellar work of goaltender Marc-Andre Fleury.
  • The opening night of the playoffs was a night of firsts for the Winnipeg Jets and the Vegas Golden Knights. Both franchises recorded their first-ever playoff victories on Wednesday, with the Jets toppling the Minnesota Wild 3-2 while Vegas shut out the Los Angeles Kings 1-0. The milestone means different things to each franchise, with Winnipeg relieved to finally earn a win and the Golden Knights happy to continue upending expectations in their inaugural season.
  • The Sedin era is nearly over in Vancouver. The Vancouver Canucks have relied on the uncanny connection between Henrik Sedin and Daniel Sedin to fuel their offense for more than a decade, but the twin brothers announced Monday that this season would be their last, as they plan on retiring once it ends.
  • The Vegas Golden Knights began as a team of castoffs, but they’re the envy of the NHL after defying the odds to reach the playoffs in their f
  • When the Winnipeg Jets drafted Patrik Laine second overall in 2016, they added a player many thought would eventually lead the NHL in goal-scoring, but few figured it would only take him two seasons. Laine’s production has exploded over the last couple months, launching him into a tie with Washington Capitals captain Alex Ovechkin for the most goals in the league. Ovechkin and Laine both have 43 goals with 10 games remaining, and at the rate they score, a 50-goal season is not out of the question.
  • Taylor Hall has a chance to experience something with the New Jersey Devils that he never could reach with the Edmonton Oilers: a playoff berth. Hall has at least a point in each of his last 26 games and the Devils are in control of their own fate in the wild card race as the season nears its conclusion one year after New Jersey tumbled to the bottom of the Eastern Conference standings.
  • The NHL trade deadline was filled with the usual buyers and sellers, but no team sold more than the New York Rangers. The Rangers fell out of playoff contention with a 2-9-1 record since the start of February, and their rebuild is off to a flying start with a flurry of trades, culminating Monday with the biggest deal of the deadline. In the last week, New York has dealt Rick Nash, Ryan McDonagh, Michael Grabner, J.T. Miller, Nick Holden, and Ryan Graves. The Rangers received six draft picks and a plethora of young talent in return.
  • While the 2018 Olympic men’s hockey tournament may have been short on NHL players, it wasn’t short on exciting and improbable moments. Sunday’s gold medal game between Germany and the Olympic Athletes from Russia was the highlight of the tournament: a David-versus-Goliath showdown that went back and forth before the Russians prevailed 4-3 in overtime.
  • Ryan Donato may have had an Olympic tournament to remember, but the U.S. men’s ice hockey team exited in forgettable fashion with a shootout loss to the Czech Republic in the quarterfinal round.
  • Alexandre Burrows will have a long time to think about what he did to Taylor Hall. The Ottawa Senators forward has been suspended for 10 games after attacking Hall in Tuesday’s game against the New Jersey Devils. The length of the suspension reflects the violent nature of Burrows’ actions, as well as his status as a repeat offender.
  • Jaromir Jagr’s NHL days are over. While the 45-year-old future Hall of Famer hasn’t officially retired, he isn’t likely to see another opportunity following his recent stint with the Calgary Flames, and he returned to the Czech Republic after the Flames placed him on unconditional waivers last Sunday. Jagr leaves as one of the greatest scorers to ever play the game, and his legacy of longevity is one few could ever hope to match.
  • It has been more than a month since the Boston Bruins last lost in regulation, going 10-0-3 since losing to the Washington Capitals on December 14. Boston defeated the rival Montreal Canadiens for the second time in five days on Wednesday, cruising to a 4-1 win on the strength of five points from its top line and a defense that limited Montreal to just 22 shots in a typically dominant performance from the hottest team in the NHL.
  • Not everyone is happy with the surprising success of the expansion Vegas Golden Knights. Vegas’ rights to use the Golden Knights name and colour scheme are under scrutiny due to a trademark claim filed by the U.S. Army, which accuses the NHL franchise of ripping off the parachute team of the same name. The claim was filed on Wednesday, the final day to oppose the Golden Knights’ trademark.
  • Neither Canada nor Sweden had much trouble advancing to the gold medal game at the 2018 IIHF World Junior Hockey Championship, but both teams look good enough to give each other a hard time when they meet on Friday. They were the two best teams throughout the group stage, and they have a long and lopsided history in the final game of the tournament, meeting five previous times to decide the gold medal with Canada winning every contest.
  • Alex Ovechkin scored the two biggest goals of Tuesday’s overtime victory against the Carolina Hurricanes. The Washington Capitals captain tied the game midway through the third period and ended it in overtime, scoring his NHL-leading 25th and 26th goals to give Washington its third straight victory. At 32 years old and nearing 600 career goals, Ovechkin doesn’t appear to be slowing down. And his best might be yet to come.
  • The Vegas Golden Knights continue to rewrite the book on what’s possible for an NHL expansion team. The Golden Knights have points in their last 10 games - a first for an expansion team - going 9-0-1 to rise to the top of the Western Conference. Once expected to be a basement-dwelling afterthought for the 2017-18 season, Vegas is looking more and more like a playoff contender with each game.
  • The New York Islanders appear to have found a new home fairly close to their old one. The Islanders have been struggling to attract fans to their games since moving to Brooklyn from Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Uniondale, but a bid to develop the land around Belmont Park could give the franchise the stability it craves.
  • The past year has been mostly good to the St. Louis Blues. Their head coaching change from Ken Hitchcock to Mike Yeo has gone about as well as a franchise could hope, with a 43-17-4 regular-season record since promoting Yeo in February. And while the Blues were knocked out of the playoffs in the second round last season, they began the 2017-18 campaign looking like Stanley Cup contenders, grabbing an early lead in the Central Division. But two untimely injuries threaten to derail St. Louis’ progress and end the year on a down note.
  • The New Jersey Devils are the new Toronto Maple Leafs. Much like Toronto did last season, New Jersey is relying on a group of rookies to revive its slumbering offense, and so far it’s working. The Devils lead the Metropolitan Division and appear poised to snap a five-year playoff drought, finally emerging from the shadow of Ilya Kovalchuk’s departure.
  • Carey Price is back to normal. After an uncharacteristically shaky October and a lower-body injury that kept him out for most of November, Price has returned to give the Montreal Canadiens some life. Price has allowed just two goals on 102 shots in three starts since his return, giving Montreal three straight wins in regulation for the first time this season, and the offensively challenged Canadiens will need Price at his best if they want to climb back into the Eastern Conference playoff race.
  • Something is definitely wrong with the Edmonton Oilers. The Oilers appeared to turn a corner last season after making the playoffs for the first time since 2006, but a quarter of the way into 2017-18, they are once again one of the worst teams in the Western Conference. There is no simple answer to Edmonton’s struggles, which now include an ongoing illness affecting the team’s captain and best player, Connor McDavid.
  • The Tampa Bay Lightning have been unstoppable for the first six weeks of the NHL season, leading the league with a 14-2-2 record and a plus-25 goal differential. The Lightning are dominating opponents at both ends of the ice, and they look like a Cup contender again after stumbling in 2016-17.
  • The NHL’s Pacific Division has belonged to the Anaheim Ducks for the last five seasons, with two trips to the conference finals to show for it. But all that success could be catching up with the Ducks, who are struggling to win games with a very depleted roster that likely won’t return to full strength for a couple months.